Blacks @ Dartmouth 1775 to 1950

African Americans @ Dartmouth College 1775-1950

Roscoe Conkling Giles, Jr.

Dartmouth College
Class of 1940 (attended: 1936-40)
Born
Mar 16, 1919, Chicago, IL
Died
Dec 07, 1984, Chicago, IL
School Dartmouth College Class 1940
Born Mar 16, 1919, Chicago, IL Year(s) 1936-40
Died Dec 07, 1984, Chicago, IL

Career summary

Federal, city and state court reporter

Quotes from biographical sources

The first official Negro U.S. court reporter for the Northern District of Illinois, was sworn in by U.S. Judge James B. Parsons, at the Federal Building, 219 S. Clark st. He is Roscoe C. Giles, Jr., 44, of 7709 S. Indiana ave., son of Dr. Roscoe C. Giles, Sr., prominent Chicago physician. The appointee was immediately assigned to the court of Judge Joseph S. Perry, who names him to the post.

Judge Perry participated in the swearing in ceremony in his chambers. Commenting on the appointment, he said, 'I want this understood, and I think it should be the policy in all appointments. I did not select Mr. Giles because he is a Negro. I appointed him because he is well qualified for the job. I wanted a good family man and he also measures up to that. I interviewed several persons after he came to me, but I knew I wanted him at first. I am confident he will do an efficient job.'

Giles' education includes study at the Institute Verdl, Vienna, Austria; completion of studies at Englewood High school, Dartmouth College; Stenotype School, San Francisco, and the College of Commerce, Chicago. He was serving as a staff assistant court reporter to Judge Parsons until he was appointed by Judge Perry. . .

Giles has had many top court reporting assignments. Among them were Federal administrative hearings in California and Illinois, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Securities Exchange Commission, Tax Court, Civil Aeronautics Administration, Loyalty Board, Department of Labor. He has also been on of the chief reporters for some of the nation's top court reporting firms.

He resides with his wife, Virginia Elizabeth and two sons, Rosco III and Morris C., at the Indiana ave. address.


Roscoe Giles Jr. Becomes First Negro U. S. Court Reporter Here. (May 23, 1963). Chicago Daily Defender, p. 3.

Other source(s)